How safe is Oxycodone?
Rehabilitation

How safe is Oxycodone?

The Opioid epidemic has been present in the U.S. for decades, and a good number of people die every year from opioid overdose. Opioids cause the most high rate of overdoses related to drugs. Oxycodone, in particular, is one of these drugs and has been the cause of plenty of unfortunate deaths. Oxycodone is considered a narcotic and is usually used to treat moderate to severe pain. While it is a legitimate medication that has helped numerous people it does have all the properties that make it an addictive drug. A lot of people become addicted because after taking it over time, they develop a tolerance to the effects of the drug. Long term use is fine with Oxycodone, but only in the case of using it exactly as prescribed to you by your doctor.

 

Oxycodone is only safe when taken as prescribed, but when taken recreationally or improperly it becomes a hazardous substance. Just like other opioids when taken for extended periods, the drug can have tremendous adverse effects on your body. Including the development of a physical dependence for the drug. When you begin depending on the drug, then you will have to face terrible withdrawals symptoms while your body is trying to shake the dependency. You must try your hardest to get rid of any addiction you may have towards opioids. Overdosing on Oxycodone is very real and can definitely happen if a person abuses the drug.

 

Oxycodone slows your nervous system, so if you’re overdosing on it, you’ll feel your body slowing down, and experience heavy, shallow breathing as well as delusions. It’s not a pleasant experience by any means and can ultimately lead to death. If you want to avoid an Oxycodone overdose, it’s extremely important to follow the instructions very carefully when taking the medication. According to the Oxycodone withdrawal timeline, it takes about 24 hours for the drug to leave your bloodstream, but withdrawals could last for up to 7 – 10 days, and it also depends on other factors such as your age, body type, and weight.